• Give a cat another chance at life and a loving home.

    When the time comes to add a new member to your family, adopting a cat is a wonderful alternative to buying one in a pet store. Contrary to the myth that animal shelters are filled with “bad” pets, most shelter and rescue cats are wonderful companions just waiting for a new home.

    The top 10 list

    The National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy (NCPPSP) published some interesting statistics on why cats are put up for adoption. Below is their Top 10 list:

    1. Too many animals in household (11%)
    2. Allergies in family (8%)
    3. Moving (8%)
    4. Cost of pet maintenance (6%)
    5. No homes available for litter mates (6%)
    6. Landlord not allowing pet (6%)
    7. House soiling (5%)
    8. Owner having personal problems (4%)
    9. Inadequate facilities (2%)
    10. Incompatibility with other pets (2%)
    Online adoption tools

    We stress that adopting a cat should not be taken lightly, but the adoption process itself can be very simple and done without leaving your home. To assist you, The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) has pulled together a guide for “adopting pets via the internet.” These guidelines are available at Pet Finder Library. Petfinder is an online, searchable database of animals from over 10,000 animal shelters and adoption organizations across the continent and a great resource for all pet adoption topics.

    Steps to adoption
    • The first step towards adoption is to find out as much as you can about the shelter or rescue group that is taking care of the cat in which you are interested.
    • Next, the ASPCA counsels, you should not be discouraged if you do not find “your cat” online immediately; “Pets come into shelters and rescue groups every day. Keep looking. Check as many sites as possible. Post your needs on Petfinder’s ‘Pet Wanted’ listing in the classified section.”
    • In keeping with the ASPCA’s outreach mission, to find their animals the best possible parents, they recommend that shelters request proof of your intent to provide a caring and safe home. This may include: veterinarian references, proof that your other pets are altered, and, if applicable, landlord permission.

    The point of such guidelines is to establish mutual confidence between the shelter and the adopting parent. Take your time and do your research. Your new pet’s lifelong devotion will be worth every minute.

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    Cats acquired from friends were relinquished to shelters more than from any other source (33.2%).